Thursday, November 30, 2017

We Were Never Told the Truth




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Dash Snow

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Did you sleep OK?

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The marvelous dogs of Dougie Wallace


In his book entitled Well Heeled, photographer Dougie Wallace has turned his camera on man’s best friend and the strange world of pet “parents”. Dogs, and his pursuit of them, have taken him to London, Milan, New York and Tokyo. Their owners, often described as “extreme pet humanizers”, can spend as much on accessorizing and grooming their “offspring” as they would on themselves.
Dougie Wallace has used his observation and wit to portray this phenomenon in his new series.

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Swimming Cindy, Los Angeles, 1977-1985 by Willy Spiller


Between 1977 and 1985, Swiss photographer Willy Spiller lived in New York and Los Angeles. Fascinated by the speed, the energy and the absurdity of the 1970s and 1980s, he roamed the streets far and wide with his camera.

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Noise





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Sarah's Scribbles

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Wednesday, November 29, 2017

About Life

Nor stony tower, nor walls of beaten brass,
 Nor airless dungeon, nor strong links of iron,
 Can be retentive to the strength of spirit;
 But life, being weary of these worldly bars,
Never lacks power to dismiss itself.
 Julius C├Žsar (1599), Act I, scene 3, line 93.

 William Shakespeare, in his many plays, produced a vast number of quotes on the subject of life.

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Shakespeare Illustrations by Irina Vinnik



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Sometimes


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MADE’s Emerging Talent Award

'Hiraki' by Charlotte Petitpierre 

 The Emerging Talent Award by MADE.com is an annual initiative designed to spotlight up and coming furniture and homeware designers — the winner then having their piece produced and sold by MADE.
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Are you addicted to your smartphone?


Klemens Schillinger has invented a set of humorous substitute phones so addicts can can cope with time apart from their devices. There’s no touchscreen on these gadgets, just a series of stone beads to handle all your swiping and scrolling.
 According to Dezeen, Schillinger was inspired by Italian philosopher Umberto Eco who replaced his pipe with a wooden stick in an attempt to give up smoking.
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Slobodan Praljak has died after taking poison at war crimes court in The Hague.


Upon hearing that his 20-year prison sentence had been upheld, General Slobodan Praljak shouted at the presiding judge: "I, Slobodan Praljak, reject the verdict. I'm not a war criminal." Then he drank from a small bottle or flask and declared: "What I am drinking now is poison."
 The judge suspended the hearing and called for a doctor. The incident happened when the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) was handing down its last judgment in an appeal by six Bosnian Croat political and military leaders, who were convicted in 2013 of persecuting, expelling and murdering Bosnian Muslims during the 1992-1995 war.

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Andy Warhol, New York City, 1985.


Scottish photographer Albert Watson began taking pictures of celebrities in 1973, when he famously shot Alfred Hitchcock holding a dead goose for Harper’s Bazaar. He now has more than 100 Vogue covers to his credit and continues to work at the age of 75.
Many of his best-known photographs are collected in Albert Watson: Kaos, a new deluxe, limited-edition anthology published by Taschen.

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Afrika - The Wild





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Tuesday, November 28, 2017

Yes, that’s it, that’s it exactly.

Ella Frances Sanders

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Be yourself @itsPeteski


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The Search


Incidental Comics

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Hilarious Cat Snapchats


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No Kids Nor Animals Were Harmed


  Photographer dad composites his kids into the most hilarious scenarios.

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The Art and Science of Ernst Haeckel


German biologist and artist Ernst Haeckel dedicated his life studying far flung flora and fauna, drawing each of their peculiar specificities with an immense scientific detail. Haeckel made hundreds of such renderings during his lifetime, works which were used to explain his biological discoveries to a wide audience. In addition to these visual masterpieces, Haeckel also discovered many microbes, and coined several scientific terms commonly known today, such as ecology, phylum, and stem cell. A new book from Taschen titled The Art and Science of Ernst Haeckel outlines the 19th-century artist-biologist’s most important visual works and publications across a hefty 704 pages.

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Wood Sculptures by Yoshitoshi Kanemaki

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