Wednesday, February 21, 2018

This will make you feel old

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The Wild Ancient Greek Drinking Game That Required Throwing Wine

For the ancient Greeks, a party wasn’t good unless the wine flowed freely.
The Greeks didn’t just fling their glasses of wine about willy-nilly, though. This game of wine-slinging—known as kottabos—had a discernible target, and both pride and prizes were on the line.
 Kottabos had two iterations. The preferred way to play, which is the iteration often depicted in plays and especially on pieces of pottery, involved a pole. Players would balance a small bronze disk, called a plastinx, on top of it. The goal was to flick dregs of one’s wine at the plastinx so that it would fall, making a clattering crash as it hit the manes, a metal plate or domed pan that lay roughly two-thirds down the pole. The competitors reclined on their couches, arranged in a square or circle around the pole a couple of yards away. Each then took turns launching their wine from their kylix, a shallow, circular vessel with a looping handle on each side. A less common version of the game featured players aiming at a number of small bowls, which floated in water within a larger basin.
 In this case, the object of the game was to sink as many of the small bowls as possible with the same arcing shots. Since it lacked the resounding clang of the plastinx striking the manes, this version of kottabos has been regarded as the quieter, more civilized way to play. Read more

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Researchers used non-invasive analysis to trace the origins of Picasso’s bronze sculptures


Thanks to a comprehensive survey conducted by researchers from the Art Institute of Chicago, Northwestern University and the Picasso Museum in Paris, scholars have a better understanding of the artist’s bronzes than ever before. As Megan Fellman writes for Northwestern Now, the international team of scientists, art conservators and curators used a non-invasive analysis called X-ray fluorescence spectrometry to study 39 bronzes and 11 painted sheet metal sculptures in the Picasso Museum’s collection. Using this method, Northwestern and the Art Institute of Chicago have compiled a database of these alloy “fingerprints” for roughly 350 artworks. These measurements, which detail percentages of metal alloys in early 20th-century bronzes, allow researchers to trace the origins of specific works. Read more

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Artist Dain Yoon creates optical illusion makeup that will have you seeing double (or triple…or more).



Yoon’s work is so mesmerizing that it’s hard to believe that it isn’t the work of Photoshop.
 To prove that it’s real—and give insight into her incredible body art process—she shares videos on her Instagram and YouTube channel. more

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Art in Ad Places




  Frustrated by the daily bombardment of advertising on the streets of New York City, artist Caroline Caldwell and writer RJ Rushmore decided to produce a project that would dampen the sheer volume of visual marketing strewn throughout their environment. The pair didn’t have the budget to prompt an entire overhaul, but they did have the incentive to construct an intervention that would offer an alternative glimpse to the city’s high volume of print-based advertisements.
For their 2017 project, Art in Ad Places, the pair recruited 55 artists and collectives from across the country to produce 55 works to be temporarily displayed on pay phone booths across New York City.

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Apple Illustrations



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A fake organ mimics what happens in the blink of an eye.


For the first time, researchers used human cells to build a model of the surface of the eye that’s equipped with a fake eyelid that mimics blinking. This synthetic eye could be used to study and test treatments for eye diseases, researchers reported February 16 in a news conference at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.
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The threat of AI is real and many of the technologies are already developed.


The Malicious Use of Artificial Intelligence report warns that AI is ripe for exploitation by rogue states, criminals and terrorists.
 Those designing AI systems need to do more to mitigate possible misuses of their technology, the authors said. And governments must consider new laws.

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Tuesday, February 20, 2018

Knitting Is Only Manly If It's Done On Horseback.


From man-pickles, to examples of identical products, except for one being pink and more expensive just… because, this list will leave you wondering why all this is necessary in this day and age. 

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Statement Jewelry

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Bogotá’s Architecture From the Sky





Colombian creative director and photographer Camilo Monzón Navas gives a new perspective on the city of Bogotá through his captivating aerial photography.

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Peter Brown’s architectural views of Texas


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House in Tschengla






Designed by Innauer-Matt Architekten, the home was built to provide a place of calm away from the chaos of the city. more

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Sleepless night


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»If these walls could talk« by Rinaldo Frattolillo

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Monday, February 19, 2018

Mom’s always right, itsPeteski

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Just can’t get comfortable.


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Had a long day? Kids driving you nuts? PUT A FISH ON IT!


Nothing beats the soothing feel of a cool fish on your face after a long hard day. This is not just any fish... close your eyes and inhale.... the magical fragrance will transport you to the provincial country side of the south of France where you lie on your back in a meadow of purple lavender flowers for as far as the eye can see... bees buzzing and sun shining, you are high as a kite as a cool breeze washes over you enveloping you with the aroma of exotic French lavender... more

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End of the world rehearsal club


Miguel Marquez Outside

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Julien Nonnon projects modern-day zodiacs in Hong Kong


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