Friday, August 29, 2014

The power of love

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This Stereo Comes with Two Sub-Woofers

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Airy biker

A new design for a hover bike – using fans to create the lift – has been launched via Kickstarter.
It is touted as the world’s first “flying motorcycle”. via

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Word On The Street

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Will Everyone Shut Up Already About How the Nordic Countries Top Every Global Ranking?

The Nordic countries are paradigms of equality, good education, female empowerment, and progressiveness. We know this because we are told. And told and told and told. To take one example, the latest Global Gender Gap rankings from the World Economic Forum were topped by Iceland (for the fifth year in a row), followed by Finland, Norway, and Sweden. (Denmark came in eighth.) Iceland and Denmark took first and second place respectively in this year’s Global Peace Index (Finland was sixth, Norway took 10th, and the comparatively violent Swedes came in 11th). Sweden was deemed the least fragile country in Foreign Policy’s 2014 Fragile States Index . This year’s four best countries in which to be a woman, according to the Global Post? All Nordic. Four of the top 14 “greenest” countries in the world, according to this year’s Environmental Performance Index? Nordic. (Filthy Finland came in at a still quite green 18th.) The country examined by the Economist this summer to explore the benefits of paid paternity leave? Sweden. The country touted by long journalistic profiles and best-selling books alike for its education system? Finland. The country profiled by the BBC for its creative approach to bettering the lives of the homeless? Denmark. The first country profiled by Slate in its examination of how good life is elsewhere for working parents? Norway. Where did NBC welcome us to this summer? Sweden. If only we could be more like the Nordic countries, we say, looking sadly at our ill-assembled Ikea furniture. Then we, too, would be better educated. Then we, too, would be more equally paid. Then we, too, would be more peaceful. Then we, too, would have dreamy blond men narrate our coffee drinking. But we cannot be more like the Nordic countries. And so it is time—past time, in fact—to say enough already to these pointless comparisons.

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Brad And Angie Got…Married?

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If A Fish Grows Up On Land, Will It Learn To Walk?

The old idiom about “being a fish out of water” just lost some of its luster. Researchers from McGill University in Canada successfully trained a group of fish to live on land and strut around.

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New research shows that the first humans in the Arctic lived there for nearly 4,000 years

A new study, published in Science, shows that the first people to populate the Arctic regions of North America and Greenland were a group who moved into the area from Siberia around 3,000 B.C. They lived in isolation for almost 4,000 years, before disappearing. Previous research has indicated that there were three waves of migration from Asia to the New World; this new study adds a fourth. The first humans are thought to have crossed over the Bering Strait more than 15,000 years ago; this new wave of Paleo-Eskimos, which brought the first people to spread across the northern reaches of Alaska, Canada and Greenland, would have come after the first two waves, but before the Neo-Eskimo or Thule made the journey between continents. Archaeologically, people living in the North American Arctic between approximately 2,500 B.C. and 1,000 A.D. are referred to as the Dorset and Pre-Dorset cultures. (They're classified into those based on the tools and artwork they left behind.) This new study shows that not only did this group have different traditions and culture from the area's later populations but it was genetically distinct from them, as well. continue 

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Sell your crap, pay off your debt, and do what you love!

There’s something strange happening around the globe… but it’s awesome!
 Lifestyles and needs are changing, and consequently, our houses are shrinking. The tiny house movement has blown up in the past few years, shifting the traditional North American housing models towards a more practical, finance-friendly blueprint. The movement is garnering attention from people fed up with the current consumerist/utility-based lifestyle which has placed millions of people in debt.
Now, the idea of living your dream is no longer a cliché.

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Thursday, August 28, 2014

Race / Off

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Invisibility

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Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

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Maddie in some tires

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Surprisingly Cute Hyena Cubs

Enough with the sloths, Internet.

 Time to catch on to the adorable side of another neglected critter.

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Peanuts

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Sneaky Panda Fakes Pregnancy For Extra Treats And Attention

Ai Hin was all set to be a star. The 6-year-old giant panda had shown signs of pregnancy last month, and staff at the Chengdu Breeding Research Centre in China had planned to film her labor in the first ever live broadcast of a panda giving birth. Now that momentous occasion has been cancelled, as it turns out Ai Hin’s pregnancy was all just a clever ruse. Chengdu staff revealed that the panda had experienced a “phantom pregnancy” and had likely faked symptoms to get extra attention and food.

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"Absolute silence leads to sadness." Jean-Jacques Rousseau

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Wednesday, August 27, 2014

What does it mean to be ginger?

Scotland has the highest percentage of people with red hair in the world, with Edinburgh - where 40% of people carry the gene - the global capital. Photographer Kieran Dodds, in his body of work Gingers, asked some of them what it meant to be a redhead.

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That’s Amore!



By Ale Giorgini, see more

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Sailfish Skips School


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