Sunday, July 23, 2017

Who the hell is Marilyn Monroe?


The photos were taken in 1950 with a still unknown Marilyn, by a Life Magazine photographer Ed Clark.


  Share/Save/Bookmark

Alen MacWeeney :: Dan Flynn and his cats, Labre Park, from the series Irish Travellers, 1967


via

  Share/Save/Bookmark

One soul in two bodies





  Share/Save/Bookmark

Atey Ghailan

more

  Share/Save/Bookmark

I’ll call you @itsPeteski

via

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Saturday, July 22, 2017

Everybody needs a hobby @itsPeteski

via

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Beware The Friendly Stranger


Invading the Vintage: retro postcards featuring aliens and space ships, by Franco Brambilla

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Elephant Seals Know When Their Opponents Are Talking Shit


A new study published on July 20 in Current Biology suggests that elephant seals are able to recognize the tone and rhythmic patterns of their rivals’ calls. Just as it is with people who squabble online, maintaining dominance is very important to elephant seals’ social order.
A team of researchers spent weeks studying an elephant seal colony in Año Nuevo State Park, California, where they were able to identify the alpha male and record his call.
The team changed the rhythm and timbre of the call, and presented two modified versions back to the seal colony, in addition to the original. When the researchers played the original alpha male call to ten “beta” males, the non-dominant seals scrambled away in fear. When they played their edited versions, however, the beta males were unafraid when the changes in the beat were more extreme.
 Therefore, the researchers concluded that the beta seals understood that they were not hearing the alpha male’s call.

read more 

  Share/Save/Bookmark

The Nose Knows



  Share/Save/Bookmark

Friday, July 21, 2017

"Dead Friends Short Film" by Changsik Lee



Share/Save/Bookmark

If dogs could talk, they’d tell us some home truths


Pet owners undoubtedly want to do the best for their animal companions, but there is still widespread misapprehension of what their pets are actually thinking and feeling, moment-to-moment.
 Read more

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Affection


  Share/Save/Bookmark

Watercolor Miniatures by Julia Las

more

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Festival Inspire


The week-long mural event Festival Inspire recently took over Moncton, Canada, adding 31 new murals to the city. The festival used both internationally known and local artists to create works on varied backdrops throughout the region. Among the names include were Canada’s BirdO, Bordallo II of Portugal, Etien, Jon Fox, Jose di Gregorio, and several others.

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Hope


Share/Save/Bookmark

Of the 9 billion tons of plastic the world has produced, only nine percent is recycled.


The rate of production has soared so much that half of that 9 billion tons of plastic was created in just the last 13 years, according to the study published this week in the journal Science Advances.
 Read more

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Thursday, July 20, 2017

Till Rabus



more

  Share/Save/Bookmark

“American Beauty” by Ludo in Paris

more

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Louis Masai in Shanghai



Red Panda. Endangered & threatened by deforestation & climate change. Color Way Of Love. Shanghai, China. July 2017.
 more

Share/Save/Bookmark

The Globe Desperately Needed a Drink

Marc Johns

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Maddie Lounging on Things


Maddie the coonhound has captured the hearts and imaginations of dog lovers all around the world. Maddie Lounging On Things follows Maddie’s adventures at play and at rest as she accompanies her owner, Theron, from Utah to Illinois to Mexico and everywhere in between.
 From cross-country trips sleeping in cars and cheap motels to visiting family near and far, Maddie finds a way to settle in for a nap in any set of circumstances.
 more

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Why Are Dogs So Friendly?


Our pet canines have alterations in their genes that make them more sociable than wolves, a new study says.

  Share/Save/Bookmark

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Watch what happens when a camera's frame rate perfectly syncs up with flapping bird wings.


Sometimes security cameras can take some strange footage, and Texan Al Brooks was in for a treat when he reviewed video from outside his home. As a bird flies by the camera, it looks to almost be floating while pausing for a moment to take in the scenery.
 This isn't the work of a video effects artist; it's actually a visual phenomenon known as a stroboscopic effect.

  Share/Save/Bookmark