Wednesday, April 16, 2014

Being a Feminist

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getting older

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A Traitor in Their Midst

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Self-actualization Course

To realize our life goals, it is often beneficial to simulate the desired success conditions. First, create an environment with items that resemble the desired outcome. Next, perform a concentration exercise by repeating the name of your goal.
 “(Goldfish… Goldfish… Goldfish…)”
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Whose Hands Are Warmer, Women’s or Men’s?

Using a special thermal camera, a National Geographic photo team captures the different body temperatures of men and women, most noticeably in their hands. see video

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Hot dog

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Cherry Blossoms Bloom in Washington, D.C.

Given as a gift by Japan in 1912, the 3,000 cherry trees bloom for only a few days each year.
The trees reached "peak bloom" last Thursday. 

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Tuesday, April 15, 2014

I'm not sure..

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A 13-year-old eagle huntress in Mongolia

Most children, Asher Svidensky says, are a little intimidated by golden eagles. Kazakh boys in western Mongolia start learning how to use the huge birds to hunt for foxes and hares at the age of 13, when the eagles sit heavily on their undeveloped arms. Svidensky, a photographer and travel writer, shot five boys learning the skill - and he also photographed Ashol-Pan.

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Incredibly Busted, Banff

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Dog Summoned to Jury Duty

Pictured above is IV Griner, a German Shepherd in New Jersey. Recently, her human, Barrett Griner IV, found a jury duty summons in his mail. It wasn't for him, but the dog.

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Five Things We Don’t Know About Tyrannosaurus Rex

At the crack of dawn this morning, a long-awaited Tyrannosaurus rex skeleton, dubbed the Nation’s T. rex, ended its epic road trip, when a 53-foot-long semi pulled up to the loading dock at the National Museum of Natural History in Washington, DC. The arrival of the Nation’s T. Rex marks both the end of the specimen’s long journey from its previous home at the Museum of the Rockies in Bozeman, Montana, and the end of the Smithsonian’s long quest to acquire a T. rex specimen. Originally named for its discoverer, rancher Kathy Wankel who found it in 1988 in eastern Montana, the fossil was excavated by paleontologist Jack Horner in 1989 to 1990. The 65-million-year-old specimen is one of the most complete T. rex skeletons found. At 38-feet-long and weighing in at 7 tons, the fossil skeleton now called the Nation's T-rex will get its moment in the spotlight, as part of the museum’s dinosaur hall, which will close for renovations on April 28 to reopen again in 2019. In June of last year, the Smithsonian reached an agreement with the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the skeleton is on loan to the Smithsonian for the next 50 years. At 80 to 85 percent of a full T. rex skeleton, the Wankel T. rex is among the most complete fossils of its kind unearthed, second only to the Chicago Field Museum’s “Sue,” which the Smithsonian tried to acquire in 1997. Beyond these stunning skeletal displays, paleontologists have found some 50 T. rex specimens, since Henry Fairfield Osborn first described the species in 1905. The king of reptiles, though mighty and well documented in the fossil record, remains largely a mystery to paleontologists who have yet to understand the creature’s basic lifestyle and biology. 

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Here's The 'Blood Moon'

The "blood moon" as seen from Korea town, west of Los Angeles, early on Tuesday.

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Was This the World's First Emoticon?

The emoticon might be older than we thought. This passage of text, which includes a cheeky smiley, is taken from Robert Herrick's 1648 poem To Fortune—and it might be the first ever use of an emoticon. Literary critic Levi Stahl thought the punctuation might be a typo in his copy of of Hesperides, but he checked out the authoritative two-volume edition of Herrick's work published last year by the Oxford University Press and found the exact same thing. Stahl has since claimed that that it could well be an intentional invention of the smiley, as the poet's work is generally cleverly written with smart, underlying humor.If its is the first instance of an emoticon, it predates other claimants to the title by about 200 years. Of course, it's not clear if it was intentional or not, and it's tricky to ask Robert Herrick now. Indeed, The New Atlantis—a journal about tech and society—points out that there's a copy in existence without the parentheses, which could mean it was a clever editorial addition sometime after the first edition appeared. In other words: we can't quite be sure if it's the first or not.
But it's fun to think that it might be.

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Monday, April 14, 2014

Derpy Animals


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Is El Niño Back?

The odds are in El Niño's favor. The U.S. Climate Prediction Center forecasts a greater than 50 percent chance that the climate-disrupting phenomenon could be upon us as early as this summer, with a two-in-three chance we'll be welcoming it by winter. Fingers are crossed in drought-ridden California, where a strong El Niño could increase rain and snowfall. continue

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In a Fog

Photograph by Antic Zlatko, National Geographic Your Shot

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Lunar Eclipse Myths

During the night of April 14 through April 15, the first total lunar eclipse in more than two years will be visible across North and South America, and from Hawaii.
The Inca feared that a lunar eclipse was caused by a jaguar attacking the moon. They'd try to drive it away by making noise, including beating their dogs to make them howl and bark.

 Marauding demons, murderous pets, and ravenous jaguars are just some of the culprits that cultures around the world have blamed for the moon's disappearance during lunar eclipses. 

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New Banksy ?

The guerrilla graffiti artist is believed to be behind the image of three trenchcoat clad agents eavesdropping on a telephone box that appeared in Cheltenham in the early hours of this morning. It is believed the city was chosen for the work because it is where GCHQ, the centre of the UK's surveillance network, is based. 

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Sunday, April 13, 2014

Never go on adventures without your trusty sidekick.


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