Saturday, March 30, 2019

GIFs by Romain Laurent



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Life in Miniature

Kath Holden is an artist of the everyday. Inspired by the world around her, Kath's creations are whimsical yet keenly observed, and a far cry from the genteel museum pieces that her contemporaries are producing. A proud Yorkshire woman, Kath reflects on her life and art as she carves a place for herself in the precious world of miniatures.
Life in Miniature from Ellen Evans on Vimeo.

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At the Beginning of Everything

World's largest consulting firm Deloitte has released the global campaign ‘Make Your Impact’ via Deloitte Digital.
Deloitte invited Onesal to design and animate the brand film for the campaign.
Deloitte - At the Beginning of Everything from Onesal on Vimeo.

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»(Waiting for-) Text for Nothing« by Joseph Kosuth


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Saturday morning

Ella Frances Sanders

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Friday, March 29, 2019

Weekend Is Here


Goldendoodles are both athletic and intelligent with an added bonus of being hypoallergenic perfect for all the people with allergies.
 Here are some hilarious and adorable photos of this sweet blended breed.

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Isle of eigg







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Vivre!




The exhibition Vivre! presents 34 photographs of resilience or the “art of navigating between rivers”. The incredible capacity of human beings to cope with a difficult situation is thus addressed in four sub-themes related to Africa and its diasporas: the social approach, the environment, questioning and exile. Through the prism of their objective, the selected artists question the contemporary world and its evolutions. They offer us, each in their own way, while resonating with each other, a reading of the current society that transcends borders.
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Find The Others

“Admit it. You aren’t like them. You’re not even close.
 You may occasionally dress yourself up as one of them, watch the same mindless television shows as they do, maybe even eat the same fast food sometimes.
 But it seems that the more you try to fit in, the more you feel like an outsider, watching the “normal people” as they go about their automatic existences.
For every time you say club passwords like “Have a nice day” and “Weather’s awful today, eh?”,
you yearn inside to say forbidden things like “Tell me something that makes you cry” or “What do you think deja vu is for?” Face it, you even want to talk to that girl in the elevator.
But what if that girl in the elevator (and the balding man who walks past your cubicle at work) are thinking the same thing? Who knows what you might learn from taking a chance on conversation with a stranger? Everyone carries a piece of the puzzle.
Nobody comes into your life by mere coincidence. Trust your instincts. Do the unexpected.
Find the others…”
 — Timothy Leary

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Racism is not welcome here.

New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern was greeted with a standing ovation as she took the stage to address a crowd of thousands gathered at Hagley Park for a nationwide remembrance service in honour of 50 people killed in the country’s worst terrorist attack.
  “The world has been stuck in a vicious cycle of extremism breeding extremism and it must end,” she said. “We cannot confront these issues alone, none of us can ... The answer lies in our humanity. But for now we will remember the tears of our nation and the new resolve we have formed.”
 “We each hold the power – in our words, in our actions, in our daily acts of kindness – let that be the legacy of the 15th of March,” Ardern said.
 She said to applause that New Zealanders had: “a responsibility to be the place that we wish to be.
 A place that is diverse, that is welcoming, that is kind and compassionate. Those values represent the very best of us. But even the ugliest of viruses can exist in places they are not welcome.
 Racism exists, but it is not welcome here.”
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Thursday, March 28, 2019

Something big is coming!


Photograph: Luong Thai Linh/EPA

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Scent linked to epileptic seizures could mean dogs can be trained to warn owners


Dogs can detect a telltale scent linked to epileptic seizures, scientists have discovered, raising the possibility that they could be trained to reliably warn owners when a seizure is imminent.
 The findings may also help explain anecdotal reports that dogs are able to sense when their owner is about to have a seizure. Knowing when a seizure is going to occur could allow people with epilepsy to have greater control and independence, meaning they could take measures to avoid injury, seek help or take medication.
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Meet Mini mum, Mini scule and Mini ature


Three Madagascan frog species catalogued in a recently published PLoS ONE study boast a fittingly witty set of names. As lead author Mark Scherz, an evolutionary biologist at Munich’s Ludwig-Maximilians Universit├Ąt, writes for the Conversation, the trio of tiny amphibians—the largest could comfortably sit on your thumbnail, while the smallest is roughly as long as a paper staple—constitute the newly minted “Mini” genus: In full, their scientific names are Mini mum, Mini scule and Mini ature.
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How Do Scientists Know What Colors Prehistoric Animals Were?


Maria McNamara, a paleontologist at University College Cork in Ireland, is trying to piece together the fossil evidence to paint a colorful picture of the past. When people think of paleontology, they often think of hard teeth and bone, but the softer parts of animals, like skin, muscle tissue and internal organs, can be preserved in the fossil record, too. It's much rarer, of course, because the squishy stuff usually rots away, but soft tissues are exactly the kind of specimens McNamara is looking for.
 She studies tissues from insects and vertebrates in order to envision what these critters looked like and how they interacted with their environments—what their predators were, where they lived, what their mating habits may have been and more.

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The Kiss



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The Scene-Filled Painted Portraits of Cristian Blanxer





In Cristian Blanxer’s painted portraits, dynamic scenes inhabit the contours of the human form.

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Wednesday, March 27, 2019

Homage to Bosch masterwork

Travis Lampe

  With more than 30 artists in tow, Outré Gallery pays tribute to Hieronymus Bosch’s masterwork “Within The Garden of Earthly Delights” in a new group show. Each artist has taken aspects of the work and crafted a piece within their own sensibilities, whether a few characters in the painting, an entire panel, or just one of its themes. The line-up includes Allison Sommers, Alex Eckman-Lawn, Alex Kuno, Hi-Fructose co-founder Annie Owens, Bill Crisafi, Brackmetal, Brandi Milne, Brad Gray, Charles Schneider, Davor Gromilovic, Ian Ferguson, Jesse Jacobi, Kiko Capile, Medusa Wolf, Meagan ‘Magpie’ Rogers, Moon Patrol, Nathan Reidt, Paul Barnes, Parker S. Jackson, Peca, Travis Lampe, and several others.

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Medusa


 The latest creation by artist Aspencrow.


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Sculptural Chairs By 97cm


Berlin-based collective 97cm has designed a series of limited edition chairs titled ‘Juxtaposition’.
The pieces reinvent the iconic 1950s Eames Plastic Chairs, transforming an everyday furniture item into a pair of sculptural objects.
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Things That Look Like Other Things


To remind you that there is way more than meets the eye, Bored Panda has collected a list of things that resemble other things.

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Manneken Pis no longer peeing water down the drain


For four centuries the celebrated Manneken Pis has embodied the laissez-faire culture of the Belgians. But, to the surprise of officials in the city of Brussels, it has emerged that the bronze statue had been weeing fresh clean drinking water – 1,000 to 2,500 litres of it a day, sufficient for the use of 10 households – directly into the city’s sewers. The discovery was made by R├ęgis Callens, an energy technician, after a meter was installed in the 61cm (24in) statue.
 This week, a channel was constructed to gather the water being discharged by the Manneken Pis to redirect it back to the statue.
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Tuesday, March 26, 2019

William Barr Reads “Moby-Dick,” Finds No Evidence of Whales

Attorney General William Barr has just read the classic American novel “Moby-Dick,” by Herman Melville, and found that the book contains “no evidence whatsoever of whales,” Barr stated on Tuesday.
 The Attorney General issued his statement on the absence of whales in the Melville classic in a two-paragraph book report released to the news media. “Those who read ‘Moby-Dick’ looking for whales will be sorely disappointed,” Barr wrote. “There are no whales here.” To illustrate his point, Barr quoted the book’s first sentence: “Call me Ishmael.” “As you can clearly see, that sentence does not have a whale in it,” Barr wrote.
 The Attorney General indicated that he hoped his report would put an end to “reckless speculation” about the existence of whales in “Moby-Dick.”
 “It’s time to move on,” he wrote. Barr disclosed that, after waiting years to read “Moby-Dick,” he was able to finish reading it in approximately fifteen minutes.

  The Borowitz Report

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Big Bang (in theory)



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Personal Message



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