Sunday, June 30, 2013

Can you push the handle down to start the Jacuzzi?

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Despite crisis, Croatia celebrates its European Union entry

Thousands of people are expected to join in the celebrations across the country, including in the main square of the capital, Zagreb, where artists will perform for dozens of EU and regional leaders until midnight when big fireworks and the singing of Beethoven’s Ode to Joy — EU’s anthem — will mark the official entry into the bloc. With an unemployment rate hovering at around 20 percent, plunging living standards, endemic corruption among its political elite and its international credit rating reduced to junk, many Croats are not in the mood to celebrate.

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Saturday, June 29, 2013

Cat And Mouse Game

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Friday, June 28, 2013

Kids... They grow up so fast!

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Tiny Gecko

Amateur snapper Corin Lenisco couldn't resist his charm. When first caught the size lizard was half the size of Corin's thumbnail - and after a year it has only grown to the size of his palm.

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Do I Wanna Know?



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Asterix and Obelix don kilts for their new adventure in the land of the Picts

Jean Yves-Ferri and illustrator Didier Conrad are the first people, other than the original creators, to produce an Asterix story. Illustrator Albert Uderzo invented the warrior Gaul with his scriptwriter friend, Rene Goscinny, in 1959. Uderzo announced his retirement two years ago. He had written the books himself since the death of Goscinny in 1977. A lecture at Alliance Francaise in Glasgow is the first time that Mr Yves-Ferri has spoken publicly about the new book, which will be published in October. It tells the story of Asterix and Obelix's journey from ancient Gaul to Iron Age Scotland and the fearsome Pictish clans living there. The book is being published in English, Scots and Scots Gaelic, along with many other world languages - several for the first time.

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Thursday, June 27, 2013

Do dogs really look like their owners?

They do in this project by Swiss photographer Sebastian Magnani – he has spliced together portraits of the owners with their four-legged friends in a series called Underdogs.

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"Diplomatic slap" for Croatia

News that German Chancellor Angela Merkel will not come to Zagreb on Sunday to a central celebration of Croatia's European Union accession was the top headline in German public television ARD's news show Nachtmagazin on Wednesday night. According to Deutsche Welle, anchorman Sven Lorigu wondered if this was a "diplomatic slap" for Croatia. He said the case of former secret service chief Josip Perkovic and the issue of his extradition to Germany was a possible reason for Merkel's cancellation.

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The Holy Sloth and Other Mystical Animals by Shwa Keirstead

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Could You Live on This Egg-Shaped Boat for a Year?

For the past month, Stephen Turner has been living in a wooden egg on the Beaulieu River in England. The artist, who’s accustomed to extended stays in extreme locales, is planning to stay there for another 11 months while he researches the changing patterns of the estuary’s marine ecology and and turns those findings into artworks inspired by his surroundings. Turner’s residence on Exbury Egg is actually part of a bigger project that is exploring sustainability and building around delicate ecosystems like the Beaulieu River. The goal of the multidisciplinary project between Turner, PAD Studio and the SPUD group, was to craft a low-tech, off-grid sustainable structure to act as an artist’s residency.
 But why an egg?

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10 things about extradition

The Edward Snowden affair shows how complicated the international web of extradition treaties is. Here are 10 quirks of the system.
1. The world's oldest surviving written extradition agreement - and peace treaty - was made by Ramesses II of Egypt and the neighbouring Hittites in about 1259 BC. Sometimes known as the Treaty of Kadesh (following a battle there some years earlier), the agreement bound both sides to repatriate criminals and political refugees from the other side. The Egyptian version of the treaty is preserved at Karnak. Its counterpart was discovered at Hattusa - site of the Hittite royal palace - in Turkey in 1916. A copy of that version now hangs on the walls of the UN headquarters in New York.

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Believe in yourself!

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Romance isn't dead

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Tuesday, June 25, 2013

50 Years of the World’s Greatest Sports Car

In 1963 a small German car company introduced its second street model. It was called the 911, and 50 years later, Porsche's sports car continues to defy the odds as one of the most successful, popular, and adored vehicles of all time.

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“Inner Voice” by by Charles Fernyhough

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Philosophy Jokes

How did Descartes Die? He stopped thinking...

 What's the difference between a philosopher and an engineer? About 80,000 dollars a year.

 How many philosophers does it take to change in a light bulb?
 "Hmmm... well there's an interesting question isn't it?" "Define 'light bulb'..."
 "How can you be sure it needs changing?"

 An engineer, an economist, a physicist, and a philosopher are hiking through the hills of Scotland. On the top of a hill they see a black sheep. "What do you know," the engineer remarks. "The sheep in Scotland are black." "No, no", protests the economist. "At least one of the sheep in Scotland is black." The physicist considers this a moment. "That's not quite right. The truth is that there's at least one sheep which is black from one side." "Well, that's not quite right either," interjects the philosopher. "There appears to be something describable as a 'sheep' that seems to be black from one side..."

 Psychologists think they're experimental psychologists.
 Experimental psychologists think they're biologists.
 Biologists think they're biochemists.
 Biochemists think they're chemists.
 Chemists think they're physical chemists.
 Physical chemists think they're physicists.
 Physicists think they're theoretical physicists. 
Theoretical physicists think they're mathematicians. 
Mathematicians think they're metamathematicians. 
Metamathematicians think they're philosophers.
 Philosophers think they're gods.

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I was just wonderin'...

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"Just Hanging Around "by Anatol Knotek

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Danger by RenĂ© MaltĂȘte

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His very first rope walk.

This is the moment a baby orangutan plucked up the courage to try his very first rope walk.

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Incredible droplet art recreates the Eiffel Tower

This patriotic image of a water-splash recreation of the Eiffel Tower was created by French photographer Vincent Xeridat, 30, from Miramas, Provence.

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Monday, June 24, 2013

This Adorable Pencil Broom Lets You Sweep Mistakes Under the Rug

Perfect for those of us lacking the confidence to write in pen the first time, this pencil features a miniature broom head eraser on the end so you can just sweep away incorrect crossword puzzle answers, and poorly solved Sudoku puzzles. more

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Agency Busy Spying on Three Hundred Million People Failed to Notice One Dude Working for It

A U.S. intelligence agency was so busy spying on three hundred million Americans that it failed to notice one dude who was working for it, a spokesman for the agency acknowledged today. “I guess we were so busy monitoring the everyday communications of every man, woman, and child in the nation that we didn’t notice that a contractor working for us was downloading tons of classified documents,” the agency spokesman said. “It’s definitely embarrassing, for sure.” Despite having an annual budget in the neighborhood of ten billion dollars, the agency had no idea that a dude who was working for it five days a week was getting ready to send those classified documents to a journalist who would then tell everybody in the world. “Maybe if we hadn’t been so busy keeping our eye on those other three hundred million people, we would have noticed that this one guy who was working right under our noses was up to something totally fishy,” the spokesman said. “But you know what they say about hindsight.” As for where that guy who leaked the documents was planning to go next, the spokesman admitted, “We don’t have a clue.” “I know what you’re thinking—an intelligence agency probably should know that Hong Kong has an international airport and that its departures board lists flights to Moscow and whatnot,” the spokesman said. “I don’t know what to say.
Maybe we need a bigger budget or something.”
By Andy Borowitz

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Confused?

Visitors enjoy Dalston House by Argentine artist Leandro Erlich in Hackney, London. Erlich has created another of his illusory installations, this time of the facade of a late Victorian terraced house, and with the aid of a mirrored surface it looks as if visitors are scaling the life-size construction.
 Photograph: John Phillips/UK Press via Getty Images 

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The Lovers Rene Magritte, 1928

Magritte’s mother was a suicidal woman, which led her husband, Magritte’s father, to lock her up in her room. One day, she escaped, and was found down a nearby river dead, having drowned herself. According to legend, 13 year old Magritte was there when they retrieved the body from the river. As she was pulled from the water, her dress covered her face. This later became a theme in many of Magritte’s paintings in the 1920’s, portraying people with cloth covering their faces.
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The RL version of Garfield and Odie

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