Tuesday, April 30, 2013

Things I Hate

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Modin



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Canine equivalent of walking arm in arm

via Nothing To Do With Arbroath

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Bella the dog mourns the loss of her beaver friend

Here, Bella the dog is dealing with the loss of her good friend Beavis, a beaver. It might seem like an unusual partnership but apparently when he was alive, the best-buddies were virtually inseparable.

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Queen Beatrix abdicates Dutch throne to Crown-Prince Willem-Alexander

The “Me and Your Dog” website thanks the now-Princess Beatrix “for all the good years”.

 Around one million of new king's subjects expected to flock to Amsterdam to celebrate generational change in royal House of Orange-Nassau.

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Monday, April 29, 2013

Dog who has already given up on today


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Briton searches for a Time Twin in Croatia

British writer Richard Avis is having the time of his life - travelling the planet looking for people who were born on the same day as him.
 Richard - born on December 1 1974 in Dumfries, Scotland - has already tracked down nine so-called 'time twins' in locations as far flung as New York and Ireland.
"The idea is to track down 40 people born on the same day as me and record what they've achieved in the same time span and put their stories into a book," explained Richard, now searching for a time twin in Croatia. So far his haul includes a US movie director, an Italian mayor, an Irish writer, an Olympic athlete in Norway, a Swedish lawyer, and a Dutch female bodybuilder. "Apart from being a lot of fun to do and read, I hope it will make some important discoveries about how people's lives are shaped by their environment and culture," he added. via

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Grizzly Bear

By Sergey Gorshkov 

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How a Serial-Killing Night Nurse Hacked Hospital Drug Protocol

Nurses deal with drugs every day. Most do so professionally, safely, reliably. A very few abuse them, getting high or selling them for a profit, mostly opiates. And a tiny minority — a handful in the history of nursing — turn medicines into a murder weapon. One such nurse was Charles Cullen.
 A former Navy electronics technician who used his technical acumen to enable his crimes and avoid detection, Cullen got away with medical murder in at least nine hospitals over the course of his 16-year career. (He was finally arrested in 2003; he’s currently serving life in Trenton Maximum Security Prison.) He eventually admitted to 40 murders, but experts familiar with the case believe that number is low, perhaps by several hundred. If they’re right, Charles Cullen is the most prolific serial killer in American history. For a murderer, a hospital is a convenient place to work. Deaths occur there every day; people are sick and succumb to illness. It was difficult to sort out Cullen’s crimes from the usual stream of codes and crashes. But Cullen was especially good at what he did.

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Saturday, April 27, 2013

Baby Orangutan With No Name

A zoo in Chongqing Municipality, southwest China has launched a competition to find a name for a newborn baby orangutan. The unnamed female orangutan is now 100 days old and was born to parents Bo Yi and Kou Lai La.


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Stop Worrying, Your Internet Past Is Not Embarrassing

There's something on the internet that you desperately want to keep everyone from seeing. Something you're deeply embarrassed of. That would show all your friends how you're not actually as smart and fashionable and ironically self-aware as you pretend to be. And you really ought to get over it. We all have stuff like this. Maybe it's a gross Facebook album from college. Or a Xanga or Livejournal or Blogger account, or a dance you did, or an a cappella YouTube video. Or, god forbid, your dating profile. (Thanks again for that, Sam. Dick.) So what's the underlying holdup we have about this stuff? On one hand, yes, yours are the same skeletons everyone else has tried to scrub from the web. But just the same, they leave you feeling impossibly exposed—especially ones where you really tapped into your feelings, like those old personal blog entries. And it's all kind of earnest for the way the internet works now, where you're required to maintain a constant ironic detachment. Which is true. But at some point, all that earnesty really betrays is that you're a human being with human feelings. 
 By Kyle Wagner /Gizmodo/more 

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Ergo

via my mixture

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Friday, April 26, 2013

How To Draw A Cat

Children's book author and cat lover Tor Freeman teaches you how to draw them like a pro.

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The perfect Martini recipe

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True story

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In Case of a Modern Art Emergency, Break Glass

Rick Clise, an American-born artist living in Australia, made this sculpture. He asks: What is art? Is it the concept or the execution of the work? What's more important, the idea or the object? Is it simply that anything produced by an 'artist' is 'art'? What is good art and what is important art? Why do some artists become 'collectable' while the rest can only wish to be? Why do some artists go in and out of favour? Does their art become more, then less important as a result? If a painting is well made but, without paint drips running down it, does that make it second rate when compared with the work of our superstars? If a five year old could make it is it still art? It's simply overwhelming!

via Neatorama

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Has anthropomorphism gone too far?

The simian star of new Disney film Chimpanzee is the latest animal to be portrayed as having human emotions. But does such anthropomorphism give a distorted view of nature?
 The current solution to this dilemma can be seen this week in Chimpanzee, a new film by Disney, shot on location in the west African jungle. It's the story of Oscar, a young chimp whose mother, Isha, is killed as the result of an attack by a rival gang. Oscar struggles to cope on his own, but is then surprisingly adopted by Freddy, the dominant male of his group. The film's footage is unimpeachably authentic, painstakingly captured over three years, and often stunning to behold. But anthropomorphism is no longer a dirty word, argues Jean-Fran├žois Camilleri, head of Disneynature: "Today, a lot of scientists are saying it's actually a mistake to be against anthropomorphism. There's a new philosophical current saying: 'Let's stop considering animals as just machines with no feelings, no emotion and no potential thinking process.' And chimps are a very good example." Chimpanzee was made with the advice of leading primatologists, he points out, including Christoph Boesch and Jane Goodall, both of whom have long argued for apes' emotional and cultural intelligence. "We can see clearly on the screen they have moments of emotion – laughter, anger," says Camilleri.
 "It would be a mistake to not take that into account."
By Steve Rose / The Guardian / more 

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Breivik survivor photographs win Sony World Photography Awards

Andrea Gjestvang wins a Sony World Photography Award for images of the survivors of the Anders Breivik massacre in Norway.

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US couple survived a 14-hour swim in shark-infested waters off St. Lucia

The fishing trip off the rugged north coast of St. Lucia was supposed to last all day, but about four hours into the journey, the boat's electric system crackled and popped. Dan Suski, a 30-year-old business owner and information technology expert from San Francisco, had been wrestling a 200-pound marlin in rough seas with help from his sister, Kate Suski, a 39-year-old architect from Seattle. It was around noon April 21. He was still trying to reel in the fish when water rushed into the cabin and flooded the engine room, prompting the captain to radio for help as he yelled out their coordinates. It would be nearly 14 hours and a long, long swim before what was supposed to be a highlight of their sunny vacation would come to an end. read more

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Thursday, April 25, 2013

Laser Forest Will Make You Hallucinate Without Drugs



 "Forest" is an interactive lighting and music installation by UK design group Marshmallow Laser Feast, which opened last month at theSTRP Bienniel in The Netherlands. Each of the "trees" in the forest is a large rod that's installed to the floor with some play such that it can sway and shiver like a tall tree. The sound in the installation responds to how the poles are moving. As you wander through, you're supposed to feel some crazy vibrations tugging at your consciousness—no magic mushrooms required. via Gizmodo
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Corgis as far as the eye could see.


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Alligator Vs Turtle

Wildlife photographer Patrick Castleberry spent 15 minutes watching this South American alligator try to prise open a turtle's shell at the Okefenokee Swanp in Georgia. more

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Jack the Balancing Dog

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Living a conjoined life

Abby and Brittany Hensel are conjoined twins determined to live the normal, active life of outgoing 20-somethings anywhere. They have been to university, they travel, they have jobs. But how easy is it for two people to inhabit one body?

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Calvin and Hobbes by Bill Watterson

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Watermelon 30 seconds or less

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Old People and Llamas: A Love Story

By her own account, Canadian photographer Jen Osborne has a pretty high tolerance for strange things. So when she got the assignment from Colors magazine last January to photograph two therapy llamas on the job at a Washington state rehabilitation center, she didn't think twice about it.

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